Language

Title

Français

Nouvelles logiques de migration et de mobilité. Les mondes universitaires face au marché│Godin, M., & Réa, A. (2011)│Circulation des savoirs et pratiques des acteurs, p. 49

Book chapter. Overview of Foreigners HE students situation in Belgium – Study performed in 2007, including large historical data and involving african, amercan and asian continents. Analysis of policy changes
German

Bildungsinländer 2011

Background information on students with another nationality. Datas and facts
Français

Immigration et intégration en Belgique francophone: Un état des savoirs│Rea, A., Dassetto, F., & Martiniello, M. (2007).

Français

La deuxième génération d’immigrés en Belgique│Bastenier, A., & Dassetto, F. (1981)│Courrier hebdomadaire du CRISP, (2), 1-46.

Français

L’étude des politiques d’immigration et d’intégration des immigrés dans les sciences sociales en Belgique francophone│Réa, A. (2007)│Immigration et intégration en Belgique francophone, 126.

Français
The objective of the paper is to provide a brief review of Belgian migrants integration policies and actors. Three issues are addressed in this paper: the question of public discourses and the political agenda on integration in Belgium; the question of the structuring of integration policies in the country; and finally the question of non-state actors and integration policies and practices. Because integration is also a competence of subnational entities of the Belgian federal State, differences appear between integration conception and policies in Flanders (combining multiculturalist and more assimilationist stances) (Jacobs 2004), in the French community (more influenced by the French assimilationist approach), and in Brussels.
Français

Penser l’immigration et l’intégration autrement, Bruylant│Bichara Khader, Marco Martiniello, Andrea Rea, Christiane Timmerman (éds.), 2006

Immigration is the subject of considerable debate, often passionate, especially in political and media fields: it is often presented as a problem. Whether the place of Islam in European societies, the veil, the regularization of undocumented migrants, integration of younger generations of juvenile crime, border control, political and media discourse on these issues are immigrants cause problems for the so-called host societies.
English

Roma survey – Data in focus. Education: the situation of Roma in 11 EU Member States│Recent report released by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights

Roma people form Europe’s largest ethnic minority and have for centuries constituted an integral part of European society. But despite efforts at national, European and international level to improve the protection of their fundamental rights and advance their social integration, many Roma still face severe poverty, profound social exclusion, barriers to exercising their fundamental rights and discrimination. These problems affect their access to quality education, which, in turn, undermines their employment and income prospects, housing conditions and health status, curbing their overall ability to fully exploit their potential. Exclusion from education takes different forms: from refusal to enrol Roma children under pressure from non Roma parents to placement in ‘special schools’ or ethnically segregated classes. Ethnic segregation is influenced by factors ranging from residential characteristics to anti Roma prejudice. Whatever the reasons, from a human rights perspective any ethnic segregation is unacceptable. In 2007, the European Court of Human Rights concluded in a landmark judgment that placing Roma children in special schools on the basis of their ethnic origin violated the government’s obligation to ensure children’s access to education without discrimination. In its decision the court refered to evidence of such segregation mentioned in other European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) reports.
English

Muslim women in higher education: new sites of lifelong learning│Article published by ANITA PICKERDEN│University of Birmingham, UK in INT. J. OF LIFELONG EDUCATION, VOL. 21, NO. 1 (JANUARY–FEBRUARY 2002), 37–43‎‏

How does a traditional research-led university embrace the implications of lifelong learning and widening participation? If it lowers its entry requirements or offers a more flexible approach to adult learning, can it continue to strive for and attain academic excellence? Using a project designed to increase participation by an under-represented group, this paper explores the institutional issues involved in developing lifelong learning strategies in partnership with local colleges and community organizations. Lifelong learning is not cheap to deliver, as non-traditional students may need additional learning support. Offcampus delivery can decimate an orderly campus-based timetable, extra exam boards had to be set up; extra books and learning resources have to be duplicated across different sites. However, the institutional benefits include greater flexibility in university procedures, and a source of enthusiastic mature learners from an under-represented group.
Français
This article presents and explains the different approaches integration of French-speaking Belgium and Flanders in the specific case the integration process for new migrants. A first part, recalls the institutional structure of the federal state

Belgian and the story of its construction, for understanding differentiation and the development of public policy entities Federated. In part, this is a description of different political integration of new migrants. In the third part, it is an explanation of these differences. Finally, in conclusion, a discussion on the potential impact of the Europeanization of intégrationsur political convergences or divergences between the constituent entities of integration policies in Belgium.

Français
This text shows the complexity from which we can realize pluralism said “cultural”: the various facets of culture come into play, since the most innocuous expressive signs to issues of values, symbolic, space institutions. Specificities of Muslim immigration.
English

MULTICULTURALISM AND INTEGRATION: STRUGGLING WITH CONFUSIONS│Tariq Modood (2011) University of Bristol

ACCEPT PLURALISM is a Research Project, funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Program. The project investigates whether European societies have become more or less tolerant during the past 20 years. In particular, the project aims to clarify: (a) how is tolerance defined conceptually, (b) how it is codified in norms, institutional arrangements, public policies and social practices, (c) how tolerance can be measured (whose tolerance, who is tolerated, and what if degrees of tolerance vary with reference to different minority groups). The ACCEPT PLURALISM consortium conducts original empirical research on key issues in school life and in politics that thematise different understandings and practices of tolerance. Bringing together empirical and theoretical findings, ACCEPT PLURALISM generates a State of the Art Report on Tolerance and Cultural Diversity in Europe, a Handbook on Ideas of Tolerance and Cultural Diversity in Europe, a Tolerance Indicators’ Toolkit where qualitative and quantitative indicators may be used to score each country’s performance on tolerating cultural diversity, and several academic publications (books, journal articles) on Tolerance, Pluralism and Cultural Diversity in Europe. The ACCEPT PLULARISM consortium is formed by 18 partner institutions covering 15 EU countries. The projectis hosted by the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies and co-ordinated by Prof. Anna Triandafyllidou.
English

Choices of Degree or Degrees of Choice?│Reay, D. et al (2001)│Class, ‘Race’ and the Higher Education Choice Process, SociologyVol. 35,No. 4,pp. 855–874

This paper draws on data from an on-going ESRC project on choice of higher education. It focuses primarily on the experiences of non-traditional applicants to higher education. Although these students are not typical of the entire university entry cohort, their narratives raise important issues in relation to race, class and higher education choice processes. These `success stories’ reveal important causes for concern as well as reasons for celebration. In particular, their experiences of the choice process are qualitatively different from those of their more privileged middle-class counterparts, highlighting key class and racial differences and inequalities.